From Page to Screen: To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before – Jenny Han

Oh how I love you, Lara-Jean. Devotedly brought to life on our small screens by the wonderful and adorable Lana Condor (whose potential as Jubliee was criminally cut away from us in X-Men: Apocalypse), TATBILB is honestly, without a doubt, on my favourite – and definitely one of the better – adaptations to date! From the heart-warming family dynamic to the instantly lovable, Peter Kavinsky, TATBILB is the modern rom-com we’ve all been waiting for, whether we knew it or not.

So, I supposed a bit of background is in order, in case you’ve managed to avoid all forms of internet recently and don’t know what To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before Is!
Based on the New York Times best-selling trilogy by author Jenny Han, this is what Goodreads has to say:
What if all the crushes you ever had found out how you felt about them… all at once?

Sixteen-year-old Lara Jean Song keeps her love letters in a hatbox her mother gave her. They aren’t love letters that anyone else wrote for her; these are ones she’s written. One for every boy she’s ever loved—five in all. When she writes, she pours out her heart and soul and says all the things she would never say in real life, because her letters are for her eyes only. Until the day her secret letters are mailed, and suddenly, Lara Jean’s love life goes from imaginary to out of control.

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From Page to Screen: Love, Simon

Also known to YA fans as Simon vs. The Homo Sapiens Agenda. Which is what I knew it as before I discovered it was being adapted for the big screen.

For those who don’t know about the popular Young Adult book:

SVTHSA-BA.jpgSixteen-year-old and not-so-openly gay Simon Spier prefers to save his drama for the school musical. But when an email falls into the wrong hands, his secret is at risk of being thrust into the spotlight. Now Simon is actually being blackmailed: if he doesn’t play wingman for class clown Martin, his sexual identity will become everyone’s business. Worse, the privacy of Blue, the pen name of the boy he’s been emailing, will be compromised.

With some messy dynamics emerging in his once tight-knit group of friends, and his email correspondence with Blue growing more flirtatious every day, Simon’s junior year has suddenly gotten all kinds of complicated. Now, change-averse Simon has to find a way to step out of his comfort zone before he’s pushed out—without alienating his friends, compromising himself, or fumbling a shot at happiness with the most confusing, adorable guy he’s never met.

I adored this book. It is a wonderful, endearing, emotional, inspiring book. I could easily continue that list of positive adjectives but I think you get the gist. Just pop over to YA Twitter and you’ll see just how widely adored this novel truly is.

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